Back to School Giveaway at Shower of Roses!

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Have you ever visited Shower of Roses blogspot?

This site is packed with tons of fun for Catholic families!

  • Arts & Crafts
  • Book Lists
  • Feasts & Seasons
  • Home School
  • Lap Books
  • Little Flowers Girls’ Club
  • Party Time
  • And More!

To celebrate the upcoming school year, Shower of Roses is hosting a giveaway each Friday for the rest of August, featuring educational products and books.

This week’s Back to School Giveaway is sponsored by Catholic Teen Books. Two winners will win six books each! Stop by and enter to win!

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CWG Book Blast! Molly McBride and the Purple Habit

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I love to stumble across a good children’s book. All my boys are teens, but I still have shelves and shelves of children’s books. Since I don’t have any girls of my own to share this with, I am sharing it with everyone who reads my blog!

Molly McBride and the Purple Habit is a fun book for Catholic girls, and a wonderful birthday or First Communion gift!

“Catholic kids young and old are following the antics of the precocious 5-year-old redhead who dreams of becoming a nun when she grows up.”

mollyMolly McBride wants to be a nun, just like her friends, the Children of Mary Sisters. That’s why she hasn’t taken off her purple nun’s habit ever since her mom made it for her. But now, everyone is saying she needs to wear a scratchy new dress for her older sister Terry’s Big Event. Will Molly and her wolf-pet, Francis, find a way to keep wearing her purple habit? Join Molly and Francis as they learn all about nuns, habits, and being close to Jesus.

Reviews I found on Amazon:

“A lovely story with beautiful artwork.”

“Nice way to teach about those called to religious life.”

“The story line is adorable and educates little ones (and curious adults!) about cloistered nuns and their habits, while explaining the Catholic meaning of First Communion.”

“This book is pure delight! The sweet, spunky Molly and her stuffed pet Francis captured my heart in this lovely story for children about the beauty of Catholic sacraments.

Jean Schoonover-Egolf is a retired physician-turned-homeschooling mom/author/artist. She resides in Central Ohio (Go Bucks!) with her handsome hubby, 2 darling daughters, and 1 very lovable rescued “Huskador.”

Follow her on Facebook, Twitter and her Website!

Chasing Liberty Giveaway

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Have you heard about my trilogy giveaway?

When I discovered that Fight for Liberty was going to be one of the books discussed on Sabbath Rest Book Talk, I got excited! Then I realized that this July 4th is the one-year anniversary of publishing the final book in the trilogy. So I decided to celebrate with a giveaway of the entire trilogy!

If you enjoy dystopian fiction that makes you think and takes you on a wild ride, I think you’ll enjoy this trilogy!

The government controls everything. The earth has been elevated above man. Faith, family, and freedom have been suppressed. A young woman seeks freedom.

This trilogy shows cutting-edge technology and developments in science. It is not farfetched. The ideologies come directly from actual, powerful special-interests groups that consider humans to be the “plague of the earth.” The third book, especially, has a strong American theme and takes readers back to the American Revolution. That’s why it was released on the Fourth of July!

Let us celebrate our country’s independence and our freedoms of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Enter to win the Chasing Liberty trilogy!

“It is a must read as this book takes you further in what happens to a society that is government run than the book Agenda 21 by Harriet Parke and Glenn Beck.”  ~Joe Goldner, co-host at The Truth Is Out There-Voice of the People Radio Show!

“Testing Liberty never disappoints as it treks through the wild, the underground, and sordid inner-city slums to prove that freedom isn’t free.”                                               ~Don Mulcare, Catholic Writers Guild

“Some regimes go out with a bang, others with a whimper. In Fight for Liberty, Theresa Linden takes the reader on a wild ride as Aldonia and its surrounds descend into chaos. Despite the seismic changes going on around them, Dedrick’s love for Liberty is steadfast. With each risky mission she undertakes, Liberty must consider where and how she can do the most good and whether her future will include Dedrick. Should she commit herself to bringing freedom to Aldonia, or are there other, more subtle ways she can make a difference? The final book in the Liberty Trilogy includes all the action and intrigue you’d expect along with the resolution of Liberty’s seemingly paradoxical quest to both be free and to belong.”              ~Carolyn Astfalk, author of Stay With Me

This giveaway is featured on the following blogs:

Sabbath Rest Book Talk

My Scribbler’s Heart Blog

Franciscan Mom

Catholic Fire

Catholic Mom – post with author interview

Bird Face Wendy

T.M. Gaouette Blog

Tim Speer – Christian Author

Molly McBride and the Purple Habit

Larry Peterson Books and Commentary

And it is advertised on Reading is My Superpower

 

 

 

 

 

A to Z Blogging Challenge: Table of Contents

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I don’t know why I’m doing this, but I thought it would be nice to put all the A to Z blog posts together. I included a lot of writing tips that I (or someone else!) might want to refer to later. So here it is!

Blogging From #AtoZChallenge 2017: Angels in Fiction

Blogging from A to Z Challenge: Letter B is for Battle and Beauty

Blogging from A to Z Challenge: Letter C ~ Creating Compelling Characters

Blogging from A to Z Challenge: Letter D ~ Dystopia

A to Z Blogging Challenge: Z is for Zenith

And that’s it! Challenge won!

If you like to write and would like to see a post on a particular subject, let me know!

 

A to Z blogging Challenge: M is for Mystery

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“M” is for Mystery

What are your favorite genres? I love reading fiction with a hint of mystery. Books in the mystery genre often involve a mysterious death or has a crime to be solved. But sometimes a mystery can have a twist. And every good book, it seems to me, has that mysterious, unknown element that keeps you turning the pages.

A writer friend of mine, Judith White, writes 1940s detective mysteries, and she puts together a fun 1940s newsletter every month that is really worth checking out. You can follow her on Facebook too.

If you like a bit of faith with your mystery, here are some Catholic Fiction Mysteries you might enjoy:

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The Perfect Blindside by Leslea Wahl

Fresh off a championship medal, Jake Taylor’s parents have dragged him to a middle-of-nowhere town in Colorado, far from where he wants to be. Smart and savvy, Sophie has spent the summer before her junior year of high school avidly following Jake Taylor in every article she can find, but now she sees the “truth” behind the story — he’s really just a jerk. When the only thing they can see is each other’s flaws, how can Jake and Sophie work together to figure out what’s really been happening at the abandoned silver mine? Follow Sophie and Jake into secret tunnels as they unravel the mystery and challenge each other to become who God wants them to be.

bird18 Notes to a Nobody by Cynthia T. Toney

Wendy Robichaud doesn’t care one bit about being popular like good-looking classmates Tookie and the Sticks–until Brainiac bully John-Monster schemes against her, and someone leaves anonymous sticky-note messages all over school. Even the best friend she always counted on, Jennifer, is hiding something and pulling away. But the spring program, abandoned puppies, and high school track team tryouts don’t leave much time to play detective. And the more Wendy discovers about the people around her, the more there is to learn.When secrets and failed dreams kick off the summer after eighth grade, who will be around to support her as high school starts in the fall? 

7RiddlestoNowhere2-500x750-17 Riddles to Nowhere by A. J. Cattapan

Because of a tragic event that took place when he was five-years-old, seventh grader Kameron Boyd can’t make himself speak to adults when he steps outside his home. Kam’s mom hopes his new school will cure his talking issues, but just as he starts to feel comfortable, financial problems threaten the school’s existence. Then a letter arrives with the opportunity to change everything. Kam learns that he and several others have been selected as potential heirs to a fortune. He just has to solve a series of seven riddles to find the treasure before the other students. If he succeeds, he’ll become heir to a fortune that could save his school.The riddles send Kam on a scavenger hunt through the churches of Chicago.

a single bead (002)A Single Bead by Stephanie Engelman

On the anniversary of the plane crash that took the life of her beloved grandmother and threw her own mother into a deep depression, 16-year-old Katelyn Marie Roberts discovers a single bead from her grandmothers rosary-a rosary lost in the crash. A chance encounter with a stranger, who tells Katelyn that a similar bead saved her friends life, launches Katelyn and her family on a mysterious journey filled with glimmers of hope, mystical events and unexplained graces.

bf6a14_2c0c44a06b9f4fc6b7e1490d5b09c76a~mv2Mission Libertad by Lizette M. Lantigua

Crack the Biblical code in this story of suspense, adventure, discovery, and faith! Fact and fiction converge in this thrilling tale of 14-year old Luisito Ramirez—a courageous boy who daringly escapes from 1970s communist Cuba— as he becomes immersed in American culture, and carries out a secret religious mission under the eyes of spies. Integrating Spanish vocabulary and Cuban culture, this novel for ages 10-14 provides an exciting story of the Catholic faith lived out during turmoil.

I’ve read and loved three of these books and the other two are on my “to read” list. But I’ve heard good things about them.

Happy writing and happy reading!

 

A to Z blogging Challenge: L is for Loner

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“L” is for Loner

lonely-814631_1920Perhaps everyone feels lonely at one point in their life. With all the changes in society and advancements in technology, it is no wonder that loneliness in American teens is a growing problem.

Mother Teresa of Calcutta said, “Material poverty you can always satisfy with the material. The unwanted, the unloved, those not cared for, the forgotten, the lonely: this is a much greater poverty.”

In my YA Christian fiction, Roland West, Loner, 14-year-old Roland feels lonely at home and at a new school. Worse, he’s the subject of cruel rumors. And he’s shy. He’d trade anything for one good friend.

As the story unfolds, Roland makes a couple of friends and he learns a powerful 3D-Book-Rolandlesson that is true for every one of us. None of us are ever truly alone. In addition to our ever-present God and our guardian angel, we are surrounded by a cloud of heavenly witnesses (Hebrews 12:1). Can these witnesses really help and encourage as it shows in Hebrews?  Can turning our attention to spiritual realities be a remedy for loneliness? Can it help a person to find their purpose while also inspiring him or her to reach out to others?

Loneliness is an important element for storytelling. After facing conflict throughout the story, and failing many times, our protagonist needs to go deep and go alone. In the “Hero’s Journey” this is called the “Innermost Cave.” Here, alone, our protagonist is brought to his knees. He comes face to face with his greatest fears and weaknesses. Here he must conquer the inner demons.

On Holy Thursday we remember the when the greatest hero prayed alone in the Garden of Gethsemane. He longed for the support of his three closest disciples, but they were not there for him. Jesus had to do this alone.

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And on Good Friday, abandoned by his followers, the greatest hero embraced the cross that would save us all.

And on three days, He rose again.

Have a holy Good Friday and a Blessed Easter!

 

 

 

 

A to Z blogging Challenge: K is for Klutz

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“K” is for Klutz

Thoughts on Character Flaws

I was an awkward girl and a klutzy teen. The majority of my friends seemed to have it all together. They moved through life with relative grace and ease.

One day in grade school, I was strolling across the playground with a friend, deep in conversation, and next thing I knew I was wrapped around a tetherball pole.

Other times, I got up to leave a classroom and my purse dragged me back to my desk, the strap hooked around the chair. Or only some of my books came with me, the others diving to the floor.

These humiliating experiences have inspired one of the characters in my Christian teen fiction: Caitlyn Summer. Caitlyn is super sweet, but she’s thin, shapeless, and klutzy. Caitlyn gets tangled in the streamers of a hanging plant, she trips climbing stairs, and worse: she blurts out things that should’ve remained secret. Her flaws humble and humiliate her but they also change the direction of the story.75HN5HHXIE.jpgWhile we want our characters to have admirable qualities and unique skills and abilities, every character needs flaws. This allows readers to either identify with or feel compassion for them. Character flaws can add tension or humor to a scene, stand in the way of a character attaining his or her goals, and give the character something to strive to overcome.

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They can be little things like a coffee addiction or fear of spiders or snakes. They can be deep psychological or moral weaknesses like pride, cowardice, and distrust.

How do you get a character’s flaws into the story?

Demonstrate it through their actions, thoughts, and dialog. They might not even see it as a flaw at first. Over the course of the story, reveal character flaws so that they are fully exposed to the character by the end of the story. In addition to beating the antagonist, give the protagonist something within themselves that they must overcome in order to bring about the victory.

Looking for resources to develop interesting character flaws? Check out this list on Writers Write. or have fun with this character flaw generator or this character trait generator.

If you are a fiction writer, I’d love to hear how you come up with character flaws. Please leave a comment.

Happy writing!