Chasing Liberty Giveaway

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liberty giveaway

Have you heard about my trilogy giveaway?

When I discovered that Fight for Liberty was going to be one of the books discussed on Sabbath Rest Book Talk, I got excited! Then I realized that this July 4th is the one-year anniversary of publishing the final book in the trilogy. So I decided to celebrate with a giveaway of the entire trilogy!

If you enjoy dystopian fiction that makes you think and takes you on a wild ride, I think you’ll enjoy this trilogy!

The government controls everything. The earth has been elevated above man. Faith, family, and freedom have been suppressed. A young woman seeks freedom.

This trilogy shows cutting-edge technology and developments in science. It is not farfetched. The ideologies come directly from actual, powerful special-interests groups that consider humans to be the “plague of the earth.” The third book, especially, has a strong American theme and takes readers back to the American Revolution. That’s why it was released on the Fourth of July!

Let us celebrate our country’s independence and our freedoms of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Enter to win the Chasing Liberty trilogy!

“It is a must read as this book takes you further in what happens to a society that is government run than the book Agenda 21 by Harriet Parke and Glenn Beck.”  ~Joe Goldner, co-host at The Truth Is Out There-Voice of the People Radio Show!

“Testing Liberty never disappoints as it treks through the wild, the underground, and sordid inner-city slums to prove that freedom isn’t free.”                                               ~Don Mulcare, Catholic Writers Guild

“Some regimes go out with a bang, others with a whimper. In Fight for Liberty, Theresa Linden takes the reader on a wild ride as Aldonia and its surrounds descend into chaos. Despite the seismic changes going on around them, Dedrick’s love for Liberty is steadfast. With each risky mission she undertakes, Liberty must consider where and how she can do the most good and whether her future will include Dedrick. Should she commit herself to bringing freedom to Aldonia, or are there other, more subtle ways she can make a difference? The final book in the Liberty Trilogy includes all the action and intrigue you’d expect along with the resolution of Liberty’s seemingly paradoxical quest to both be free and to belong.”              ~Carolyn Astfalk, author of Stay With Me

This giveaway is featured on the following blogs:

Sabbath Rest Book Talk

My Scribbler’s Heart Blog

Franciscan Mom

Catholic Fire

Catholic Mom – post with author interview

Bird Face Wendy

T.M. Gaouette Blog

Tim Speer – Christian Author

Molly McBride and the Purple Habit

Larry Peterson Books and Commentary

And it is advertised on Reading is My Superpower

 

 

 

 

 

A to Z blogging Challenge: R is for Research

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“R” is for Research

Love it or hate it, every writer needs to do it. Whether writing fiction or non-fiction, your book can benefit from research. Since the research aspect is obvious for non-fiction, and I don’t write non-fiction anyway, this blog will focus on researching for fiction.

Ideas for Research

Characters – we want our characters to have unique talents, interests, and abilities, but we also want them to be realistic.

Got a child in your story but no child at home to base him on? Visit family or friends or even the library. Pay attention to the unique speech, mannerisms, interests, and interactions of children of different ages.

Got a teen in your story? Head out to the mall for some people watching! Pay attention to clothing styles and jewelry, along with the unique way each teen’s personality shows through body language and verbal communication.

For adult characters, consider people in your family or workplace and note different characteristics, personality quirks, and manners of speech that might work for a character in your book. Warning: don’t create a character that resembles a real person too closely if the person might take offense.

IMAG0097I modeled Toby Brandt in Roland West, Loner on my oldest son, who has autism. This character captures the personality and interests of my son at age 8 or 9, including his manner of speech and interesting behaviors and obsessions. And even some of the story conflict. While every child with autism is unique, I hope that people will find Toby a realistic character.


Setting – long, detailed passages of weather or setting descriptions will bore our readers, but we need enough details to allow them to picture the setting in their minds.

When possible, go on location to gather details. Go into the woods, warehouses, wilderness, or wherever your scene takes place. Take a notebook and focus on all five senses. When you can’t go on location or you want even more ideas, use the research of other writers, for example try the Setting Thesaurus on the Writers Helping Writers website.

I will share another favorite resource for setting details on the “V” blog next week.


Story ideas – these can come from anywhere and go in any direction but getting a few facts can go a long way in making a story feel believable. We don’t want readers to be thrown out of our story world because something doesn’t ring true.

Rightfully Ours Front (002)In Carolyn Astfalk’s new release, Rightfully Ours, sixteen-year-old Paul Porter relocates to Pennsylvania during his dad’s deployment. He makes a temporary home with the Muellers and develops a friendship with Rachel, the Muellers’ teenage daughter. Their abiding friendship deepens as they work side by side to uncover what could be lost treasure.

Author Carolyn Astfalk wanted to get her facts straight with this story so she researched sink holes (where and how they happen and how you rescue someone from one). She also researched how custody of a minor is handled when a single parent is deployed. And, she had to research how gold bars are authenticated.

Her hard work researching for this story makes it all the more believable and allows readers to truly immerse themselves in the romantic and adventure-filled story line. The e-book is available on Amazon and the paperback is coming soon. You can check out the book trailer here.


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The ideas for my dystopian trilogy came directly from the news. Governments too often step on the rights of the individual. Scientific and technological developments often cross ethical boundaries. And special interest groups attempt to indoctrinate us in order to push hidden agendas.

Because this trilogy is set in the near future, I did an incredible amount of online research into actual ideologies that influence world governments, the latest scientific developments, and cutting-edge technology. Unlike some dystopian stories, nothing that happens in this trilogy is that farfetched. If we don’t reclaim our culture and cling to faith, family, and freedom, this is a real possibility for our future.

The more I learned from research, the more I realized I needed to write this dystopian story. I only meant to write one book and get back to my other stories. I wanted to end Chasing Liberty showing a seed of change being planted. But I couldn’t stop thinking about it. What exactly is this freedom we should be fighting for? And how can one person make a difference?

This trilogy is available through most online booksellers and you can find the book trailers on my website.


What type of research have you done for your stories and what are your favorite resources?

Blogging from A to Z Challenge: Letter D ~ Dystopia

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D is for Dystopia!

A dystopia is an imaginary society that is undesirable or frightening.

Who wants to read a novel about such depressing stuff and why would anyone write about it?

I wrote my Chasing Liberty dystopian trilogy as a way to consider where certain ideologies might lead. We all believe in caring for the earth, but some very influential elitists believe that the earth is more important than people, population numbers need drastically reduced, and humans should be corralled into contained cities.

So…if the earth was elevated above man, what does that look like?

These highly influential special interest groups also believe that faith in God and the traditional family stand in the way. Let’s face it: when you have faith and family, you care about the world around you and everyone in it. You think about right and wrong. Stuff matters. Crush faith and family, and a government can rule without opposition.

So…what does a society look like when faith and the traditional family have been suppressed?

Perhaps all dystopians are written to warn people about current ideologies or trends that could lead to a frightening future.

Here are a few modern dystopians, including my own:

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This is a reboot of a classic! Born not in a past of corsets and bonnets but into a future of cloning and bioterror, could Jane Eyre survive? This Jane is an “unclaimed embryo,” the living mistake of a reproductive rights center–or so her foster family tells her. At age ten she is sold into slavery as a data mule, and she must fight for freedom and identity in a world mired between bioscientific progress and the religions that fear it. What will happen to a girl without even a name of her own? (available on Amazon)

The third one is hot off the press! Cadain’s Watch: Michelle and Jason escaped the wreckage of their beloved hometown and are determined to live free. Though they are hunted by the totalitarian bureaucracy, they vow to resist oppression no matter the cost. But insidious evil still threatens. Once proud Americans are hopeless and unwilling to fight, making it that much harder for the rebels in their quest for Liberty. And so, God intervenes, and the angel-warrior Cadáin is sent to watch over those whose spirits are unbroken. (available on Amazon)

Chasing Liberty dytopian trilogy – This novel explores the loss the individual faces when government is allowed to grow too big and reach too far. The traditional family is nonexistent. Human life loses value. The earth is elevated above man. It shows the importance of faith, family, and freedom through a story about a society devoid of all three.  Available in paperback and ebook on Amazon or through your local bookseller.

Do you enjoy reading dystopians? What are your favorites and why?

The Lonely

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We know that God is everywhere and that we are surrounded by the cloud of witnesses mentioned in Hebrews 12:1. But almost everyone feels lonely at times. Mother Teresa said, “Material poverty you can always satisfy with the material. The unwanted, the unloved, those not cared for, the forgotten, the lonely: this is a much greater poverty.”

Who are these lonely people? The elderly whose children no longer visit? The physically and mentally handicapped? Those who are not called to the religious or married life and so live alone? Or does loneliness affect all of us, and too often?lonely-814631_1920

Statistics show that families today make less effort to eat dinner together. People attend less clubs or meetings than in the past. Friends are not even invited over as often as before. Is this the result in developments in technology? We communicate with text messages and email. We prefer solitary entertainments, electronic games and social media, to face-to-face activities.

Are we creating a society of lonely people?

How aware are we of the cloud of witnesses that surround us? Can turning our attention away from self-gratification and toward the spiritual realities be a remedy for loneliness?  Can it rid us of loneliness and help us find our purpose while inspiring us to reach out to others?

God is everywhere, and He calls us into the Communion of Saints. We are not meant to find our meaning or satisfaction strictly in the things of this world. We are pilgrims on earth. Other members of the Communion of Saints stand before the face of God, contemplating God himself and praying for us. We have not been forgotten by them. And we should not forget those around us still struggling on this pilgrimage of life.

“Exactly as Christian communion among our fellow pilgrims brings us closer to Christ, so our communion with the saints joins us to Christ, from whom as from its fountain and head issues all graces, and the life of the People of God itself.” (CCC 957)

Theresa Linden, author of Roland West, Loner