Summer & Books: 6 Dates to Disaster

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Inspired by the A to Z Blogging Challenge this past April, I have decided to blog about books for the month of June. I will be sharing tidbits about my own books and the other books on the Catholic Teen Books website.

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About the Book:

When Wendy’s family faces financial hardship, she must find a way to see Mrs. V and Sam again—but will she lose David forever in the process?

For her mom’s birthday, Wendy finds an old jewelry box at a flea market—the perfect gift for someone who loves salvaged junk. But inside the box is a cryptic note that appears to have been written recently. Wendy’s curiosity leads her on a search with boyfriend David at her side, eager to help. Who wrote the note, and did the intended recipient ever see it? But when Wendy’s stepfather loses his job, she needs more personal and urgent help—the financial kind.

The family’s plan to visit Alaska on vacation is headed down the sewer like a hard Louisiana rain. How will Wendy ever see Mrs. V or Sam again? An opportunity arrives in the form of tutoring Melissa, one of the Sticks, and Wendy’s money problems appear to be solved. Until the arrangement takes a turn that gets Wendy into trouble like never before. In the final months of ninth grade, she might lose everything she counted on for the future.


In addition to the fun story line and getting to hang with characters that I’ve come to know and love, this book gave me a lot to think about. Wendy has a lot of opportunities and moral choices to make in this story. I like to know how authors come up with story ideas and themes, so I asked Cynthia Toney a question.

Have you ever risked everything (or almost everything) like Wendy does to see someone you miss or to get what you want?

Today I’m not as impulsive as I was as a girl or young woman, but yes, I’ve taken risks in attempting to get what I want. There’s a saying: “The heart wants what the heart wants.” Often, I’d become frustrated because of a setback or because something wasn’t happening as quickly as I’d like. I’d leave a situation for what seemed a better one and then regret not giving the first one a little more time to develop into what I needed. Or I’d act out of desperation and later realize how undignified I appeared. Like Wendy, I found my integrity slipping away when I didn’t think my decisions through before making them.

~Cynthia T. Toney

My review:

Cynthia Toney has written another fun story in her “Bird Face” series. Many of the characters you’ve come to love in the first two books are back, even if only through email. Main character Wendy Robichaud and her family face new struggles. And Wendy stumbles upon a new mystery, a cryptic note she finds in an old jewelry box that she bought as a present for her mother. Wendy makes some choices she doesn’t quite think through and they lead her into a ton of trouble.

A great book for young teens that gives the reader a lot to think about: family responsibilities; giving tough advice to a friend; making mistakes, owning up to it, and paying the price.  I enjoyed the Cajun touches like this one, “My stomach flipped like a crab cake on a spatula.” I recommend this book for any teen, especially if they’ve enjoyed the first two books in this series.

Visit Cynthia T. Toney:

Website:  http://www.cynthiattoney.com

Blog:  http://birdfacewendy.wordpress.com

Facebook Author Page:  https://www.facebook.com/birdfacewendy

Goodreads:  https://www.goodreads.com/CynthiaTToney

Twitter:  @CynthiaTToney

Instagram:  @CynthiaTToney

Pinterest: Cynthia T. Toney, YA Author

Thanks for stopping by my blog! Have you stumbled upon a favorite book this summer? Tell me about it in the comments. Feel free to share a link.

CathTeenBooks

A to Z Blogging Challenge: T is for Teen Fiction

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T“T” is for Teen Fiction

People love to buy books for children for so many reasons:

  • they want to encourage children to develop their literacy and language skills
  • stories promote imagination
  • reading provides a time of quiet and reflection in busy little lives
  • reading books gives parents and grandparents an opportunity to bond with their children and grandchildren
  • and these are only a few of the benefits

I would like to write children’s stories one day. I have several ideas in mind (I actually have several written as first drafts). But I love writing stories for teens, with teenage characters facing all the challenges, discoveries, and joys teens face. The teenage years can be trying in many ways, but they are also exciting. Adulthood is just around the corner. That can be terrifying but it also feels like the whole world is open to you! Where will you be tomorrow? What will you do? Whom will you meet? Sometimes the question is as basic as: Who am I?

Some studies show that kids read for fun less as they get older. But other surveys show that young adults are among those most likely to be book readers. According to one survey, over 77% of teens say they’ve read at least one extra book per month for personal pleasure.

Why should we write and why should people buy books for teens:

  • reading takes you on an adventure
  • reading can help develop the imagination
  • a person can discover new ideas, places, and people
  • reading develops the capacity to “see” the invisible, spiritual realities and moral concepts
  • it can help one to deal with our increasingly complex world and begin to understand some adult issues that a teen will soon have to deal with
  • one can find solutions to personal problems by seeing how characters solve problems
  • reading relaxes mind and soul
  • reading improves the thinking process
  • reading improves vocabulary and spelling while the reader is wrapped up in the story line
  • some fiction can even help a teen to know that they are not alone, that others may feel the same way they do
Over the years, I’ve met many authors of Christian teen fiction, and I’ve read and enjoyed their books. I’ve often shared their books with others, promoting them through social media or by word of mouth because I think others will enjoy and benefit from them.

Inspired to join together in sharing our stories, a group of Catholic teen fiction authors have recently created a website.
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Authors include:

Genres include:

Contemporary
Historical
Mystery
Romance
Speculative
Saints
Dystopian
This website also provides information for teachers, including themes and resources for each book.
An incredible amount of excitement surrounds this new website, including inquiries and comments from readers and authors alike. We hope to see it grow into something wonderful for God, helping young readers find books they will thoroughly enjoy and that support, rather than tear down their faith. We’ll be adding more authors and more books in the near future. So stop by often!

Do you read YA fiction? What are your favorite books and why do you read?