Blog Tour ~ Last of Her Kind


Science fiction is one of those genres that lets the reader’s imagination take off. Through science fiction we get to explore new worlds or alien races, or our own world in the future. We get to consider the impact of actual or imagined science on society or individuals. And through some books, like A. K. Frailey’s, we get to look deeply at our own human nature.

I am happy to take part in the blog tour for A. K. Frailey’s science fiction Last of Her Kind.  And I look forward to the release of the next in her Newearth series, Justine Awakens.

LHK-Cover3 (002)

Anne Smith faces the end of one human era and the beginning of an alien alliance—united but unique in Last of Her Kind. A new future unfolds as Oldearth passes into obscurity, but the seeds of Newearth are planted. The human family faces a new horizon….

As a prelude to the Newearth series, Last of Her Kind sets the stage for an inter-alien alliance, which must learn to value human beings as more than throwaway tools. Cerulean’s admiration for Anne evolves into an extraterrestrial high road—offering the universe true humanity.

“This is a creative, thought-provoking, and visual science fiction. All the characters are well-developed with unique personalities, but my favorite is Cerulean, the “casual but dignified” guardian-alien, who develops strong feelings for humanity and for his charge, Anne. I love how the story unfolds and delves into human nature, exploring the possibilities of where humanity could end up, shown both through human characters and the eyes of Luxonian aliens.”                  ~Theresa Linden

More Reviews

With her latest journey, Last of Her Kind, I’m reminded of why I love her style. It’s fresh and new. I like the direction she takes in this new SciFi universe.”  ~Josh Beckman

Last of Her Kind is an inspiring triumph of faith and perseverance in the shadow of the impending apocalypse. Frailey’s emotionally captivating writing reminds the reader what it means to be human.”  ~TheNickofTime


In silence, Earth turned on its axis, a sharp contrast to the bustling reality on the surface. A hidden mind slipped past the blue and white sphere. His interest focused on Lux, a world of light beings, luminous in the reflection of their own glory.

Story Quote…

“It’s like Sunday night. Remember, when you were a child and vacation ended? School on Monday was staring you straight in the face, and you had to get to bed. You wondered, ‘Did I waste it? Did I waste my chance?’ But nothing you did could keep Monday from coming.”

Coming Soon…

Newearth: Justine Awakensa world where deception rules but truth prevails.


New Release: Molly McBride and the Party Invitation


I found a series your children will love!

As a writer, mother, and homeschooler, it has been important to me to instill a love of reading in my children. Although my boys are teens now, I still love to check out great books for all ages. I particularly love stories that are fun but also have a moral message. Just the other day, I found a series that your children will love: the Molly McBride series by Jean Schoonover-Egolf, who is both author and illustrator.Molly-McBride-and-the-Party-Invitation-cover-1-19

Earlier this month, Jean Egolf released the third book in this series: Molly McBride and the Party Invitation: A Story About the Virtue of Charity

Story summary:
Molly McBride is turning six, and her momma is planning a BIG party. Everyone in Molly’s class is supposed to get an invitation. But should a certain class bully be invited, too? Or would it be better if his were “lost”? Join Molly and friends as they learn that doing acts of charity, while always a good thing, isn’t always a party.

My review:  “Jean Schoonover-Egolf has captured the excitement and struggles of young children in the pages of this sweet story! Molly McBride and the Party Invitation brings Jesus’s lesson of loving one’s enemy to life through the eyes of soon-to-be six-year-old Molly. I love how themes from the Gospel are shown through this story and how the children, especially Molly, take these themes to heart. This is a wonderful story for children about finding happiness in doing the right thing and true charity when faced with unkind people. And the illustrations on every page are amazing!”     ~Theresa Linden

5.0 out of 5 stars Beautifully Written and Illustrated : “Paperback Beautifully written and illustrated, Molly McBride and the Party Invitation is the third in a series of books about Molly, a little girl who enjoys dressing in a purple habit. This one is about Molly’s sixth birthday party. Her mom insists on inviting every student in Molly’s class, but Molly doesn’t want to invite the bully in the class because “he is mean.” This is a wonderful book that illustrates the virtues of charity and love of neighbor. Highly recommend!”  

~Ellen Gable Hrkach, February 16, 2018

The first two books in this series:


Volume 1: Molly McBride wants to be a nun, just like her friends, the Children of Mary Sisters. That’s why she hasn’t taken off her purple nun’s habit ever since her mom made it for her. But now, everyone is saying she needs to wear a scratchy new dress for her older sister Terry’s Big Event. Will Molly and her wolf-pet, Francis, find a way to keep wearing her purple habit?Join Molly and Francis as they learn all about nuns, habits, and being close to Jesus.

Volume 2: Molly McBride is back and she is as stubborn as ever about her purple habit. She will wear nothing else! She’s managed to keep it on for her sister’s Big Day, but now the faith-filled five-year-old has a whole new wardrobe worry: kindergarten! Join the McBride family and the kindergarten class at Holy Trinity School as Molly and her loyal wolf-pet, Francis, discover that what we wear isn’t as important as what God sees inside of us.

Jeanie Egolf-22
About the Author
Jeanie Egolf is a retired physician-turned-homeschooling-mom/artist/author who resides in Central Ohio (Go Bucks!) with her awesome hubby Jay Scott Egolf, MD, two amazing daughters, and one rescued “Huskador” puppy. Dr. Jeanie’s art is available for purchase throughout galleries in Ohio and Florida and online at
Social Media Links:

Book Clubs, Book Talks, Book Blogs


I am a strong believer in the power of good fiction to transform lives.

After all, Jesus used fiction to teach and to reach the hearts of his listeners. Non-fiction can provide information and facts and appeal to our intellect and reason. But a well-written fictional story has the potential to create empathy and to reach hearts.

Prodigal_Son_CHS_cathedralConsider the story of “The Prodigal Son.” When Jesus wanted to teach the Pharisees and scribes the powerful message of hope and salvation for the sinner, he could have simply spelled it out in non-fictional words: God desires salvation for everyone, including the sinner. All are invited to the table of the Lord. So chill, brothers, while I eat with these tax collectors and sinners.

But Jesus wanted to speak to their hearts, so he chose to tell them a story. And his story had the dual purpose of reaching the tax collectors and sinners as well.

Jesus created characters that each of his listeners could identify with, he made those characters closely related (a father and his two sons), and he told a story that would touch hearts and produce empathy.

Fiction is good for us! Especially when we thoughtfully consider the story line, character growth, and themes…when we seek to learn something from what we’ve read.

Would you like to dive deeper into fiction and grow from what you’ve read? I encourage you to participate in the monthly YouTube Live Event Sabbath Rest Book Talks with hosts Erin McCole Cupp, Carolyn Astfalk, and Rebecca Willen.


Check out Sabbath Rest Book Talks Reading Selections for 2018. If you’d like to participate, read the books for the month and comment during the live event. This month one of my books is being featured, so I am offering a chance to win a signed copy of Standing Strong. Comment during February’s SRBT for your chance to win.

The other books featured on Sabbath Rest Book Talks in February are All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr (this is a Pulitzer Prize winner) and Easter Bunny’s Amazing Day by Carol Benoist and Cathy Gilmore, the founder of Virtue Works Media.

open bookOther ways to dive deeper into fiction: check out the book reviews by Carolyn Astfalk and link up your own reviews of the books you’ve read. Carolyn posts An Open Book every month, giving short reviews of books she and members of her family have read. I have found many new books that I’ve absolutely loved, just from following her blog.

Another book reviewer to follow: Steven McEvoy and his blog “Book Reviews and More.” Steven McEvoy is a prolific reader and reviewer. Check out the list of books he’s read and reviewed over the last couple of years and prepare to be amazed. His reviews are thorough and insightful. I’ve added many books to my “must read” list by following his blog.

TFG-Trademark-Logo-300x215In addition to reading more, consider starting a book club. If you have teenage girls, you will want to check out “TOTALLY feminine GENIUS GENERATIONS BOOK CLUB,” which is a book club for teen girls, their moms, aunts, grandmothers, etc. It is such a fun and effortless way for women to mentor the teen girls in their lives. From the site: ” It’s far more powerful to SHOW rather than tell the kind of wonderful women God designed our girls to be.”

With the hope of helping readers gain more from my books (and as an aid to homeschooling parents and teachers) I am currently writing study guides for each of my books. These study guides will be available free on my website on the “Book Clubs” page. The guide for Roland West, Loner is complete and ready for download.

These are just a few of the many ways you can enrich your life through fiction. Please share your own ideas in the comments!

Book-giving Guides


Christmas shopping can be overwhelming. You want to show someone that you care about them, that they are important to you. And you want to give them something they will enjoy and even treasure for years to come. But as you’re scrolling through gift items on-line or wandering through yet another store, questions pop into your mind:

  • Will he like this?
  • Does she already have that?
  • If I spend all this money on this, will it be worth it?
  • Will they stop playing with it in a month or two?
  • What size does she wear?
  • What does he really like to do?
  • Do they already have something like this?

Lately, I’ve stumbled across a few great gift-giving lists. These are not your ordinary top-ten-toys lists. These are lists of books! Book-giving guides!

Books make fantastic gifts because they cost so little and give so much. Books can transport readers into different times and places. They allow you to leave your own life for a while and step inside someone else’s life. And if the book is Christian fiction, it gives the reader even more! Christian fiction can provide gems of value that can transform lives, jump-start faith, and delve into new and deeper insight.

I’ll share links to some of those book-giving guides here:

The first two lists are compiled by author Carolyn Astfalk. In addition to writing Christian romance, Carolyn is a full-time mom to four children and an avid reader. She posts a monthly “Open Book” blog that anyone can link to if they want to share what books they’ve been reading. I am always discovering new titles of interest on her blog.

I found another super-awesome book list on Jeannie Egolf’s Peanut Butter & Grace blog. This blog is worth following too. Previous posts give other “Shop Catholic” gift ideas, Advent reflections, video suggestions, and so much more!

peanut butter

Shop Catholic This Christmas

Virtue Ink is another not-to-be missed website. Cathy Gilmore, the founder of Virtue Works Media, is dedicated to helping parents, grandparents, and teachers become effective spiritual mentors to the children and teens they love. You can learn about the TOTALLY Feminine GENIUS Generations Book Club on her website too. But be sure to check out the reading & entertainment list:

For the Catholic teen in your life, stop by for books in a variety of genres and many award-winning titles.

I will update this blog post if I discover more!

And I invite you to check out the new Christmas video that showcases my books!

Happy Advent!








Book Review: The Grace Crasher


516arGS316L._SX331_BO1204203200_It’s been a long time since I’ve laughed so much while reading a book. This story has so many hysterical parts! I absolutely loved it!

The Grace Crasher opens with Julia and her best friend Robin in a Christian store, shopping for things that can help Julia look like she’s evangelical. She desperately wants to get an apartment but the landlady is a born-again Christian.

At one point, Julia tries on a shirt and turns her backside to Robin.

“Does this Jesus shirt make my butt look big?”

“Not big, just …trapezoidal.”

Then they move to the Bibles. Julia grabs the plain one that simply said Holy Bible because it seemed like the most Bible-ish one.

We soon learn more about Julia, her family, and her interests. She has a crush on Dylan Heath, the lead singer of a local indie band, but when she sees cute Mark, the store’s manager, she decides it’s a good idea to have a backup crush.

I must admit: it was Carolyn Astfalk’s review of The Grace Crasher that compelled me to get a copy for myself. Her book reviews are thorough and reliable, and I think we have similar tastes.

I cracked this book open (actually I read an ebook, so that phrase doesn’t really work) expecting to find a light, humorous, enjoyable story that I could read a little at a time before bed, and I was not disappointed. Author Mara Faro pokes fun at both Evangelical and Catholic Christians, but not in a mean way. It was all gut-busting fun! But as the story developed I also found surprising depth of character and story-line. The main character faces trials many can identify with and goes through a beautiful transformation.

Well-developed and realistic characters, along with the continuous humor, and the deeper spiritual insights made this a fantastic story that I highly recommend.

Other Reviews:

“A great take on infatuation vs. love, speaking the truth in love, and being true to yourself.” ~

“Julia’s path is a relatable one, and in her flaws and the flaws of the characters around her, we see ourselves and our own brokenness with delightful clarity.” ~

“Loved it! Fun, inspiring, quirky,…I had lots of laughs reading this!” ~Amazon review

Funny, insightful, and brilliant!” ~Vera A. Velk

A hilarious, poignant story that sets the broken love among families, friends, lovers, and fellow believers against the backdrop of God’s unfailing, patient, perfect love.” ~

You can learn more about the author Mara Faro at her website.

You can get the book on Amazon in both paperback or ebook format.

Book Review of Angel on Assignment


Today we have another guest post from author Susan Peek!


Book Review of Angel on Assignment by Wanda Carter Roush

The moment I saw the gorgeous cover of Angel on Assignment written by Wanda Carter Roush and illustrated by Mike Motz, I knew my children HAD to have this book.

Although I haven’t read Elf on the Shelf, for which this story is a Christian alternative, I was nonetheless delighted by the idea of a Guardian Angel “sitting upon a shelf” watching over whatever child God had assigned him. But before the young reader gets to that part, the book kicks off introducing angels from the New Testament.  Gabriel the Archangel appears first, greeting the Blessed Virgin Mary at the Annunciation, then visits Saint Joseph with instructions to name the Baby “Jesus.” Next come the Heavenly Spirits who filled the sky on Christmas night, followed by those present at the Manger, the Crucifixion, and the Resurrection of Our Lord. After introducing these angels from Holy Scripture, the author shifts focus and the rest of the book is about our own Guardian Angels and how they protect, inspire, comfort, and encourage us. The final pages contain directions on how young children can make, with parental help, a craft angel to sit on their own bedroom shelf!

I absolutely love the concept of this story. The message is joyful, and presentation fun, and the illustrations alone are worth the price of the book. The only thing that disappointed me is that the text is written as a poem (I assume Elf on the Shelf is too) and some of the stanzas seemed contrived, as if the author was fumbling to fit rhyming words together. In several places, my 8-year-old had a bewildered look on her face, not understanding the awkward rhyme, which forced me to stop and paraphrase what the author intended to say. That broke the flow of the story and was frustrating. I wish the text was more “little-kid-friendly” with perhaps a simpler rhyme. Having said that, I definitely plan to purchase a copy as a Christmas gift for a little girl I know.

I received a complimentary copy of this book from BookCrash in return for an honest review. I received no other compensation and the opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own.

ChristmasFrontCoverSusan Peek is the author of fast-paced and exciting saints stories for children and young adults. I highly recommend her books as Christmas gifts, whether you have children or teens to shop for. Be sure to check out her Christmas story The Forgotten Christmas Saint: St. Anastasia!

#Open Book: November 2017


This is my second Open Book blog post! I don’t know if anyone caught the date of my last Open Book post, the one for September, but I titled it with the year 2107! Wow, I was really looking into the future with that post! library-2544157_1920

I hope that by the year 2107, I’ll be reading books from the Divine bookshelves!

One reason I like doing the Open Book blogs: I’ve discovered that while it feels like I have no time to read, I actually #AmReading! I guess it feels like I don’t read because I don’t get to read in my favorite way: resting on a mound of pillows on the couch with a hot beverage and pastry within easy reach in a quiet house, for hours and hours and hours. Oh well; there’s always the Divine library in the year 2107 for that.

I am happy to participate in and Carolyn Astfalk’s My Scribbler’s Heart #OpenBook, where bloggers link posts about books they’ve recently read. You are welcome to link up your own blog about the books you’ve read. Stop by Carolyn’s blog to see how.

Jairo'sBattleFrontCover I first stumbled upon Lisa Mayer’s Aletheian Journeys a year or so ago. I enjoyed The Arrow Bringer, the first book in the series, and jumped at the opportunity to read the second book. These fantasy stories contain Christian allegory, much in the style of C.S. Lewis and Tolkien. They are filled with action, adventure, battles, and a bit of magic. Jario’s Battle shows the struggles of a man who has turned away from a life of profound wickedness. As he strives to fight the good fight, his past continues to haunt him. He wants others to believe that he’s changed, but at times he can’t even convince himself. I enjoyed the thorough development of themes about free will, forgiveness, and the purpose of suffering.

I love solving puzzles. Lately, I’ve been addicted to Sudoku. The lousy game keeps me up51Bfmxs18CL._SY346_ at night. I tell myself, “As soon as I find one more number, I’m turning out the light.” Then I find another number, and I’m saying the same thing again! I guess I like to keep my mind busy, and maybe that’s why I enjoy Judith White’s 1940s mystery series. I was excited to learn that Drowning in Deception, the next installment of The Case Files of Sam Flanagan, is out! Set in Detroit, these sleuth stories remind me of the Old Time Mystery Radio Shows. I’ve come to know the regular characters, so it’s fun to see them again in each new book. My favorite is Sam Flanagan’s grandmother! In addition to enjoying the great time-period details, I love how Judith White’s mysteries are a challenge to solve. She develops characters and threads so well, revealing a bit at at time so that you’re never really sure who done it! Her newsletter is quite a treat too. I encourage everyone to sign up. It’s unique and entertaining.

Because I am now following Erin McCole Cupp’s Sabbath Rest Book Talks, several of the books I’ve read have Christmas themes! Unlike the rest of the country, I don’t like to think about Christmas until we are at least in Advent. (I guess that’s not entirely true because I think christmasgracecoverabout the Blessed Nativity every Monday when we pray the Joyful Mysteries of the Rosary! But I digress…) Anyway, I still enjoyed these Christmas-themed books.

The first one I read was Christmas Grace by Leslie Lynch. This story follows three women (a mom, her daughter, and her mother) who are also not in the Christmas mood, each having her own personal struggles. Natalie is pregnant and her husband is deployed, Ella’s husband takes her for granted, and Gert is trying to find herself after losing her husband. Before they find answers to those problems, crisis strikes and they are forced to reevaluate their priorities. This story got me thinking about the challenges and blessings of different stages of life.

unearthingchristmascoverThe next book I read for the SRBT was Unearthing Christmas by Anthea Piscarik. This book is hard to get a hold of at the moment, so I am grateful to Carolyn Astfalk for sharing her copy. This story jumps back and forth between 1955 and modern times, following two 14-year-old girls and their families. The families have their share of flaws and you can see how the faults of one generation affect the next generation. When one of the girls gets permission to turn the family bomb shelter into her own personal Christmas room, the story takes a wild turn. This story brought home to me the message that we shouldn’t put of reconciliation because tomorrow is never promised to us. I also enjoyed a little thread about the Infant of Prague and the St. Andrew Christmas Novena.

The Birds’ Christmas Carol by Kate Douglas Wiggin is the third book that I 413qLkDHFALstarted reading for Sabbath Rest Book Talks. I didn’t get to finish the book yet because I was reading on my library’s website and they only let me read the first chapter. My reserved copy just arrived at the library so I’ll finish it today. But so far it seems like a sweet Christmas story that would make a perfect read-aloud. It begins with a beautiful presentation of family and motherhood. And the descriptions are lovely. The brand-new baby girl is described as “a rose dipped in milk” and “a little cherub with a halo of pale yellow hair softer than floss silk.”

Okay, that’s all I’ve got for this month! If you want to link up to Open Book with the books you’ve read, you are more than welcome to! Click here for details.